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The UK NSC recommendation on Diabetes screening in adults

 
Recommendation Systematic population screening programme not recommended
Last review completed July 2014
Next review due in 2017/18
 
Key downloads
 

Find general information about population health screening.

Why is screening not recommended by UK NSC?

The UK NSC review found evidence that population screening for Type 2 diabetes is not effective in improving the health of those identified as at risk.

The Committee recognises the important public health issue diabetes presents and the need to improve primary prevention efforts to address the growing number of people at risk of diabetes (such as through lifestyle and diet changes).

More about Diabetes

Diabetes is a long-term (chronic) condition caused by too much glucose (sugar) in the blood. It is also known as diabetes mellitus.

Type 1 diabetes occurs when the body produces no insulin. It is often referred to as insulin-dependent diabetes. It is also sometimes known as juvenile diabetes, or early-onset diabetes, because it usually develops before the age of 40, often in the teenage years.

Type 2 diabetes occurs when not enough insulin is produced by the body for it to function properly, or when the body’s cells do not react to insulin. This is called insulin resistance. Type 2 diabetes is far more common than type 1 diabetes.

» Read more about type 1 diabetes on NHS Choices

» Read more about type 2 diabetes on NHS Choices

Stakeholders

British Society for Immunology
Diabetes UK
Royal College of General Practitioners

The stakeholder groups will be involved when the recommendation is next reviewed. If you think your organisation should be added, please contact us. More information for stakeholders can be found in appendix C of the UK NSC evidence review process.

Recommendation Review History

The last review of screening for Diabetes was published in 2014, following the first review in 2006.

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